I run an annual Wreck Photo trip, and it has proved quite popular, not least of which with me!

I say this because to be honest I’ve never been much of a wreck afficionado, but over the years I’ve learnt to love the wrecks of the Red Sea loads, and have developed an approach to shooting them which isn’t born within a deep understanding of triple expansion engines, portholes, and the rest of the metal work which engenders passion within the wreck diving community.
Don’t get me wrong I’m also interested in the history and background to the wrecks, but it isn’t my driving reason for shooting them.
I am mostly interested in them as havens for wildlife, and I like to use them as a framework to make pictures, and love the contrast of the distorted metal work with a nice blue or green background and hopefully some compliant marine life  willing to pose for my camera lens.
And if not the marine life I like to use the twisted metal as a dramatic backdrop to shoot a diver, to lend scale to illustrate our marvellous hobby.

I have previously written a series of blogs which I will link to below which give you some information about the nuts and bolts of shooting wrecks.

 

 

 

 

Planning and Shooting a Wreck Picture (part one)

 

Planning and Shooting a Wreck Picture (part two)

 

Planning and Shooting a Wreck Picture (part three)

 

 

 

 

And I would like to show you a couple of pictures with my thoughts behind them, some I’ve shared before but there are some new ones here which I think highlight why I think a good wreck is a great place to take pictures.

 

 

 

I've gone for a really simple composition here of just the propshaft of the Thistlegorm, and it appealed to me because of the very simple almost 3D effect made by the angle at which I've shot, and the strong colour contrast between the rusty metal work, and the blue of the background. With the diver in the background lending some scale.

I’ve gone for a really simple composition here of just the propshaft of the Thistlegorm, and it appealed to me because of the very simple almost 3D effect made by the angle at which I’ve shot, and the strong colour contrast between the rusty metal work, and the blue of the background. With the diver in the background lending some scale.

 

 

I’ve gone for a really simple composition here in the shot above,of just the propshaft of the Thistlegorm,  it appealed to me because of the very simple almost 3D effect made by the angle at which I’ve shot, and the strong colour contrast between the rusty metal work, and the blue of the background. With the diver in the background lending some scale.

 

 

 

This is the anchor winch of the Thistlegorm, and it invariably has a cloud of Anthias around it which inject a strong contrasting colour into the proceedings.

This is the anchor winch of the Thistlegorm, and it invariably has a cloud of Anthias around it which inject a strong contrasting colour into the proceedings.

 

 

 

 

This shot above is the anchor winch of the Thistlegorm, and it invariably has a cloud of Anthias around it which inject a strong contrasting colour into the proceedings. Which I think makes the shot, as in my opinion the winch on its own and perfectly illustrates why wreckage becomes home to countless creatures.

 

 

 

 

The artificial cave made by these scattered ammo boxes, has been adopted as shelter for this moray living within them. Their obviously man made geometrical shapes framing one of the Red Seas iconic predators.

The artificial cave made by these scattered ammo boxes, has been adopted as shelter for this moray living within them. Their obviously man made geometrical shapes framing one of the Red Seas iconic predators.

 

 

 

 

 

The artificial cave made by these scattered ammo boxes in the picture above, has been adopted as shelter for this moray living within them. Their obviously man made geometrical shapes framing one of the Red Seas iconic predators. Frames within frames are a classic compositional device, and wrecks provide perfect opportunities to use this technique. Like with the shot below framing my buddy Christian.

 

 

 

 

 

You just need to get your angles just so, to hide enough of the sun behind your foreground object. I've not got it exactly right here, but sometimes you need to cut yourself some slack, and to be honest it wouldn't have been fair on my model to make him fin into quite a strong current at this point for much longer !!

You just need to get your angles just so, to hide enough of the sun behind your foreground object. I’ve not got it exactly right here, but sometimes you need to cut yourself some slack, and to be honest it wouldn’t have been fair on my model to make him fin into quite a strong current at this point for much longer !!

 

 

 

 

 

The shot above was taken on the Million Hope wreck in the Northern Red Sea and to see how I took this picture please click this link here.

Another popular photo wreck is the Ghiannis D and I visited there quite a few times this year, I’ve tried to suggest scale and perspective in the picture below with the diver very small in the frame, I did a blog post dedicated to just this wreck this year and if you’d like to see it please check out this link here.

 

 

 

 

 

Like in the previous shot, I've used a diver to add scale, and in this case I've composed horizontally or in landscape as its more commonly called.

Like in the previous shots, I’ve used a diver to lend scale, and in this case I’ve composed horizontally or in landscape as its more commonly called.

 

 

Here’s another from inside the Ghiannis D which has used the dramatic interior lighting and again a diver is used as a focal point to balance the shot.

 

 

 

The Ghiannis D is lying at an angle of around 30 degrees or so which is quite disorientating the first time you dive her, the trick is to watch your buddies bubbles.

The Ghiannis D is lying at an angle of around 30 degrees or so which is quite disorientating the first time you dive her, the trick is to watch your buddies bubbles.

 

 

 

 

And finally back to the Thistlegorm below, for one of my personal favourite shots of the year, a technique picture of the stern of the Thistlegorm with my buddy Adel, one of the excellent dive guides from Tornado Marine.
I’ve done a blog showing how I’ve implemented this technique so have a look and click here.

 

 

 

 

 

Slow shutter speed picture of the Fusilier action at the stern of the Thistlegorm.

Slow shutter speed picture of the Fusilier action at the stern of the Thistlegorm.

 

 

And finally if you’d like to join me on this years Wreck Photo trip or any of my Red Sea trips, where I usually include a wreck or two in the itinerary anyway then please visit the page and click here.

 

Duxy