The blog I did at the end of last week, Taking the Liberty, was comprised of pictures from my first dive on the Liberty wreck.

 

Liberty
The Liberty has been such a hit we’ve elected to do it as our first dive of the day every day since!
Photographically it has delivered for our photo trippers by the spadeful. And you can’t turn a corner of the Liberty without yet another soft coral adorned piece of wreckage making the perfect frame against the beautiful blue of the background.

I think even if you were a diehard wreck phobic, it would be hard not to like this beautiful place, with every inch covered in vibrant life.

So here’s a couple more pics I’ve taken of her this week since.

 

Yet another coral overloaded piece of the Liberty Wreck!!
Yet another coral overloaded piece of the Liberty Wreck!!

 

 

 

A haven for marine life of all kinds from Nudibranchs through to fish, and abundant coral
A haven for marine life of all kinds from Nudibranchs through to fish, and abundant coral

 

 

 

It's hard to imagine just how densely the life is packed into and onto the Liberty Wreck
It’s hard to imagine just how densely the life is packed into and onto the Liberty Wreck

 

 

 

Coral Garden
Our second boat dive on each day has been the dive site right next door to the Liberty called Coral Garden, and it’s a gently sloping site, that starts at one end with an artificial reef made up of a few Buddhist statues, and other eastern mystical structures in about 12-16m of water, these are providing a perfect home for the local marine life.

 

At the other end of the site, and an alternative entry point, is a fantastic cleaning station, for Grouper and other reef fish to get a wash and brush up from the small army of shrimps living there. If you’re feeling brave you can hold out your own hand, and have the shrimp minister their attentions on you, loosening and snipping off with surgical precision, loose bits of skin around your cuticles, and nail ends. The really brave even allowing the shrimp to clean between their teeth!

These two sites have provided the mainstay of our photographic endeavours, with people relishing the opportunity to perfect their shots, if the previous day didn’t deliver. Which has a two fold benefit. The first is the opportunity to really get to know a site, work out the suns direction, the angles and suitable spots to insert a model. The second though is that diving a site many times really allows you to get under the skin of a place, and pushes your brain into a more creative way of thinking I reckon, as all of the guests at some time or another, have shown me their shots, and in all cases they’ve  benefitted by revisiting the Liberty and the Coral Garden, and rethinking how they can shoot things.

 

 

 

The Coral Garden, is an artificial reef, in the form of a temple. Here the fish are using the protctive cover of a birdcage statue.
The Coral Garden, is an artificial reef, in the form of a temple. Here the fish are using the protctive cover of a birdcage statue.

 

On the other side of the birdcage, a Moray uses the underneath as a hole to hang out in.
On the other side of the birdcage, a Moray uses the underneath as a hole to hang out in.

 

 

At another part of the Coral Garden an arrangement of tyres makes a perfect home for a school of glass fish.
At another part of the Coral Garden an arrangement of tyres makes a perfect home for a school of glass fish.

 

 

 

 

The Secret of Macro Photography
This wasn’t all though and one of the great benefits of Scuba Seraya is a world class muck or critter dive as it’s house reef which is called Seraya Secrets. And with unlimited free unaccompanied shore diving you have the perfect option to get some fantastic macro shots of the weird and wonderful creatures that inhabit the shallows only a 20m walk from the dive centre to the waters edge.
Here’s a selection of my favourite close up shots from this productive site.

 

 

A tiny Scorpionfish is snootlit from behind with a bit of fill flash to the front
A tiny Scorpionfish is snootlit from behind with a bit of fill flash to the front

 

 

A Scuttling Crab looks demonic when lit from the side with a narrow beam of light.
A Scuttling Crab looks demonic when lit from the side with a narrow beam of light.

 

 

A nudibranch head on, and lit with a snoot to isolate the nudibranch from the messy sand it lives on.
A nudibranch head on, and lit with a snoot to isolate the nudibranch from the messy sand it lives on.

 

 

A Yellow Pipe Fish, normally shy shot using very shallow depth of field to focus attention on the eyes
A Yellow Pipe Fish, normally shy, shot using very shallow depth of field to focus attention on the eyes

 

If you want to know a bit more about some of the techniques I’ve used here then check out my other blogs.
For snooting I’ve done a four part series starting here

For general flash photography check out here

Or better still why not come on one of my photo workshops and I can help you with the techniques to get better photographs. Here is a link to my upcoming world wide workshops.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this photo orientated blog, check back soon for a full trip report about Scuba Seraya itself.

Duxy