A great little Dive Centre in Indonesia 

I’m currently in Bali at a fab little Indonesian dive centre and resort called Scuba Seraya.

So the fourth and final instalment of my recent blog series on shooting in available light is being put on hold for a couple of weeks whilst I tell you a little bit about the highlights of underwater photography based here at Scuba Seraya.

Upon arrival we were met with a spectacular thunderstorm that pierced the surrounding sky with impressive forked lightning, and loud crashes and rumbles, letting us know that we were well and truly in the tropics.

I will furnish you all with a trip report going into greater detail about the resort itself when I get back, but as this is a photo blog I would like to jump straight in with a piece about one of Scuba Seraya’s USP’s.

Our first day was spent shore diving and straight off the beach they have a world class muck dive Seraya Secrets ( more of that in the next blog) , with all the usual suspects, Frogfish, shrimps, and  nudibranchs aplenty enough to satisfy the most ardent macro shooter.

The next day though we wanted to venture further afield, and we had all heard about the USAT Liberty  wreck . It’s  a very short boat ride away (around 10mins) to the left of the resort. Our guides got us there early around 0630am as this is a world famous wreck dive, and as such receives a huge amount of attention from divers all over Bali. Our  approach by boat though turned out to be a goidsend, as most other groups have to shore dive it, adding an extra layer of complexity and a little more work.

The USAT Liberty an American cargo ship, was holed by a Japanese sub, in the early stages of WW 2 in the Lombok Straits. Damaged but not sunk she was eventually towed and beached at Tulamben on the Bali coastline. Where she lay, until 1963  whereupon the grumblings of the local volcano caused her to slide into the water, a very short distance from the waters edge, where she lays to this day, providing a perfect haven for a vast diversity of marine life and corals.

My buddy and I Phil, descended into the still dark early morning water, and so the wreck appeared majestically out of the gloom. The viz wasn’t the best, but this only added to the drama, and before we’d even got our cameras sorted, we came across some Bump Head Parrotfish. Unfortunately they disappeared into the darkness very quickly and quietly, and I didn’t manage to get a shot off in time. So I’ll have to try again tomorrow, which of course is one of the main benefits of a photo trip like this, being able to repeat dives at the same sites, that way you can perfect your shots.

Ok, that’s enough talk for now and here’s a few reasons why I think the Liberty Wreck is a world class underwater photographic studio. These were only from my first dive there, I will post some more stuff from the Liberty next week

One of the many spots on the Liberty covered with glass fish

One of the many spots on the Liberty covered with glass fish

 

A piece of the structure of the Liberty showing just how covered with coral she really is.

A piece of the structure of the Liberty showing just how covered with coral she really is.

 

A diver looks on at the coral encrusted structure of the Liberty Wreck

A diver looks on at the coral encrusted structure of the Liberty Wreck

 

Because of the nutrient rich water and the currents in the area, corals and marine life of all types flock to the Liberty wreck.

Because of the nutrient rich water and the currents in the area, corals and marine life of all types flock to the Liberty wreck.

 

 

Scuba Seraya is perfectly positioned to access the Liberty being only a very short boat ride away, and diving her by boat seems infinitely preferable to, struggling at the shore line and wasting valuable gas going to and from the wreck from the waters edge.

Stay tuned and I’ll bring you more next week about the delights of Scuba Seraya in Bali.